Psychology

Second European Edition

by Daniel Schacter, Daniel Gilbert, Daniel Wegner and Bruce Hood

Psychology and me

Click on the links below to see psychology graduates talking about their current roles as teachers, researchers and practitioners. They discuss what they enjoyed most and found most challenging about their undergraduate degrees and provide nuggets of advice for students just starting their course. They demonstrate the wide range of careers available to students after they leave university and also the exciting applications of psychological research.


Introduction from Bruce Hood
Author Bruce Hood introduces the Psychology and me videos and discusses the key skills that you learn in a psychology degree.


Chapter 3: Kylie Pascua Leones
Assistant Psychologist at University College London Hospitals specializing in neuropsychology.


Chapter 4: David Crundall
Applied cognitive psychologist based at Nottingham Trent University in the UK.


Chapter 5: Sue Sherman
Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Keele University in the UK.


Chapter 8: Tone Roald
Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.


Chapter 10: Richard Keegan
Sport psychologist based at the University of Canberra in Australia.


Chapter 16: Sharon Buckland
Rehabilitation worker at Headway Cambridgeshire in the UK.


Chapter 17: Angel Chater
Health psychologist working in the School of Pharmacy at University College London in the UK.


Chapter 12: Tanya Byron
Chartered Clinical Psychologist specializing in children and adolescents, journalist, author and broadcaster.

1. What is it that you do?

I qualified as a clinical psychologist from UCL in 1992 and have been practising clinically ever since. I am now a Consultant in Child and Adolescent Mental Health but also see adults (often although the child is the ‘presenting patient’ their difficulties are symbolic of chaos in their family system and the adults, e.g. parents, may have the mental health difficulties). I also write a weekly mental health column for The Times newspaper and a monthly column in Good Housekeeping, as well as articles for several magazines and newspapers. I present on psychology and current affairs for BBC TV and Radio 4. I advise the UK government and international governments on mental health in children and young people and digital technology, and I authored the independent review; The Byron Review (2008; 2010). I have authored five books on mental health including The Skelton Cupboard – the making of a clinical psychologist (Pan Macmillan 2014).

2. What do you wish you knew when you were a psychology undergraduate?

The breadth of application of a psychology degree – I have found this out as I have developed my career. Also the public health importance of making evidence-based psychology available within mainstream media – as a profession we still have a long way to go to achieve this.

3. What advice can you offer students about their future careers?

Think broadly and outside the box. Be creative in your application of evidence-based psychological knowledge. Challenge all and every example you see in the mainstream media where psychology is misused, misquoted or represented by non-psychologists. Use social media to deliver psychological theory and evidence to a wide audience.

4. What did you love and hate about studying psychology when you were an undergraduate?

When I was at school my parents were told I would never be a ‘high-flyer’. However when I got to York University and started my undergraduate degree I realized that I had a brain and I loved using it! I couldn’t get enough of the degree and loved all modules. The only part of the degree I hated was Research and Statistics but I am glad I persevered and passed that module because I now enjoy engaging in research and being able to critically evaluate the research findings of others.

4. What did you love and hate about studying psychology when you were an undergraduate?

When I was at school my parents were told I would never be a ‘high-flyer’. However when I got to York University and started my undergraduate degree I realized that I had a brain and I loved using it! I couldn’t get enough of the degree and loved all modules. The only part of the degree I hated was Research and Statistics but I am glad I persevered and passed that module because I now enjoy engaging in research and being able to critically evaluate the research findings of others.




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