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Virginia Woolf - Mrs Dalloway

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Red Globe Press

Pages: 192
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Readers' Guides to Essential Criticism

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Paperback - 9780230506428

14 October 2015

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Hardcover - 9780230506411

14 October 2015

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Ebook - 9781137547927

16 September 2017

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Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway (1925) has long been recognised as one of her outstanding achievements and one of the canonical works of modernist fiction. Each generation of readers has found something new within its pages,...

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Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway (1925) has long been recognised as one of her outstanding achievements and one of the canonical works of modernist fiction. Each generation of readers has found something new within its pages, which is reflected in its varying critical reception over the last ninety years. As the novel concerns itself with women's place in society, war and madness, it was naturally interpreted differently in the ages of second wave feminism, the Vietnam War and the anti-psychiatry movement.
This has, of course, created a rather daunting number of different readings. Michael H. Whitworth contextualizes the most important critical work and draws attention to the distinctive discourses of critical schools, noting their endurance and interplay. Whitworth also examines how adaptations, such as Michael Cunningham's The Hours, can act as critical works in themselves, creating an invaluable guide to Mrs Dalloway.

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Places criticism in the context of critical movements and trends
Considers creative adaptations like Michael Cunningham's The Hours

Introduction
1. Early Responses
2. Recovering Woolf: Criticism in the Era of Second-Wave Feminism
3. Woolf and Philosophy
4. Structuralism and Post-Structuralism
5. Woolf and Psychoanalysis
6. Sexuality and the Body
7. Historicist Approaches
8. Mrs Dalloway and The Hours
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index.

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Michael Whitworth is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century Literature at Merton College, Oxford. He has published widely on Virginia Woolf and Modernism.

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Michael Whitworth is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century Literature at Merton College, Oxford. He has published widely on Virginia Woolf and Modernism.

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