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How to Study a Charles Dickens Novel

Author(s):
Publisher:

Red Globe Press

Pages: 152
Series:

Macmillan Study Skills

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Further Actions:

Recommend to library

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Paperback - 9780333467282

18 June 1989

$35.99

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This book provides a clear method of study which encourages students to construct their own interpretation of any of Dicken's novels. It helps students to identify a novel's major thematic concerns and interests and to argue...

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This book provides a clear method of study which encourages students to construct their own interpretation of any of Dicken's novels. It helps students to identify a novel's major thematic concerns and interests and to argue a case purely from the evidence of the text. But it also moves beyond a straighforwardly thematic analysis to consider how a novel is put together and how it works. This in turn provides students with a way of identifying the distinctiveness of Dickens's fiction and with a way of structuring an intelligent critical response to any of his novels.

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General Editor's Preface
Acknowledgements
PART 1: INTRODUCTION: READING A DICKENS NOVEL
PART 2: HARD TIMES
PART 3: GREAT EXPECTATIONS
PART 4: BLEAK HOUSE
PART 5: MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT
PART 6: DOMBEY AND SON
PART 7: WRITING AN ESSAY
Further Reading.

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KEITH SELBY taught in higher education for seven years. He has published his own poetry, fiction, and many articles and reviews, as well a Screening the Novel: the Theory and Practice of Literary Dramatisation (with Robert Giddings and Chris Wensley, 1988).

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KEITH SELBY taught in higher education for seven years. He has published his own poetry, fiction, and many articles and reviews, as well a Screening the Novel: the Theory and Practice of Literary Dramatisation (with Robert Giddings and Chris Wensley, 1988).

Show Less

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