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The Social Psychology of Attraction and Romantic Relationships

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Red Globe Press

Pages: 256
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Paperback - 9781137324825

15 December 2014

$44.99

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Ebook - 9781137324832

16 September 2017

$35.99

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Why are we attracted to some people and not to others? Are first impressions accurate? Why do some romantic relationships succeed while others fail? Are our romantic choices influenced by evolution?

In tackling questions like...

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Why are we attracted to some people and not to others? Are first impressions accurate? Why do some romantic relationships succeed while others fail? Are our romantic choices influenced by evolution?In tackling questions like these, The Social Psychology of Attraction and Romantic Relationships reviews the theory and research behind this fascinating area. It combines real-life anecdotes and popular media examples with the latest psychological studies, making it a lively and engaging read.Ideal for students of social psychology and intimate relationships courses, this is a comprehensive introduction to an everyday subject that, on closer investigation, proves to be a dynamic, intriguing, and sometimes surprising area.

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A concise overview of the psychological theory and research perfect for students who want to go the extra distance in their coursework

Combines social and evolutionary perspectives to provide a rounded view of the topic

Reallife examples drawn from the media and elsewhere will provoke lively classroom discussions, while "What the Research Says" features will scratch the surface of key studies and explore the ways in which they were conducted

PART I: ATTRACTION
1. Forming Attitudes toward Potential Partners: First Impressions of Physical Characteristics
2. Forming Attitudes toward Potential Partners: First Impressions of Non-Physical Characteristics
3. First Impressions of Non-Physical Characteristics: Levels of Acquaintance and the Importance of Meeting in Person
4. Evolutionary Theory
5. Initiating and Enhancing Attraction
PART II: ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS
6. Assessing and Changing Attitudes toward Romantic Partners
7. Romantic Relationships
8. Sex and Love
9. Gender.

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Madeleine A. Fugère is Professor of Psychology at Eastern Connecticut State University, USA. Her research and teaching interests include social psychology, statistics, research methods, and attraction and romantic relationships. She has previously published articles related to romantic relationships, sexual double standards, and teaching psychology courses.
 
Jennifer Leszczynski is Professor of Psychology at Eastern Connecticut State University, USA. Her research interests include contextual influences on masculinity and femininity and gendered beliefs about love across the lifespan. She also studies how using community engagement in college classrooms can dispel gender and age stereotypes. 
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Madeleine A. Fugère is Professor of Psychology at Eastern Connecticut State University, USA. Her research and teaching interests include social psychology, statistics, research methods, and attraction and romantic relationships. She has previously published articles related to romantic relationships, sexual double standards, and teaching psychology courses.
 
Jennifer Leszczynski is Professor of Psychology at Eastern Connecticut State University, USA. Her research interests include contextual influences on masculinity and femininity and gendered beliefs about love across the lifespan. She also studies how using community engagement in college classrooms can dispel gender and age stereotypes. 
 
Alita J. Cousins is Associate Professor of Psychology at Eastern Connecticut State University, USA. Her research focuses on conflict in romantic relationships, particularly mate guarding in dating couples. She has published research articles in a variety of journals on topics such as mate guarding, mate retention tactics, aggression in romantic relationships, and changes in relationship dynamics across the menstrual cycle.

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